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Archive for the ‘B vitamins’ Category

Why would anyone want to eat sea vegetables?

How about, because they offer the broadest range of minerals of any food, containing virtually all the minerals found in the ocean-the same minerals that are found in human blood.

That’s why!

Sea vegetables are an excellent source of iodine and vitamin K, a very good source of the B-vitamins, folate, and magnesium, and a good source of iron and calcium, and pantothenic acid. In addition, sea vegetables contain good amounts of lignans, plant compounds with cancer-protective properties.

Promote Optimal Health

Lignans, phytonutrients found in sea vegetables, have been shown to inhibit angiogenesis, or blood cell growth, the process through which fast-growing tumors not only gain extra nourishment, but send cancer cells out in the bloodstream to establish secondary tumors or metastases in other areas of the body. In addition, lignans have been credited with inhibiting estrogen synthesis in fat cells as effectively as some of the drugs used in cancer chemotherapy.

In postmenopausal women, fat tissue is a primary site where estrogen is synthesized, and high levels of certain estrogen metabolites (the 4OH and 16OH metabolites) are considered a significant risk factor for breast cancer.

In addition to lignans, sea vegetables are a very good source of the B-vitamin s and folic acid. Studies have shown that diets high in folate-rich foods are associated with a significantly reduced risk for colon cancer.

Promote Healthy Thyroid Function

Sea vegetables, especially kelp, are nature’s richest sources of iodine, which as a component of the thyroid hormones thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3), is essential to human life. The thyroid gland adds iodine to the amino acid tyrosine to create these hormones. Without sufficient iodine, your body cannot synthesize them.

Because these thyroid hormones regulate metabolism in every cell of the body and play a role in virtually all physiological functions, an iodine deficiency can have a devastating impact on your health and well-being. A common sign of thyroid deficiency is an enlarged thyroid gland, commonly called a goiter. Goiters are estimated to affect 200 million people worldwide, and in all but 4% of these cases, the cause is iodine deficiency.

Nutrient Prevention of Birth Defects and Cardiovascular Disease

The folic acid so abundant in sea vegetables plays a number of other very important protective roles. Studies have demonstrated that adequate levels of folic acid in the diet are needed to prevent certain birth defects, including spina bifida. Folic acid is also needed to break down an intermediate dangerous chemical produced during the methylation cycle called homocysteine. (Methylation is one of the most important cellular cycles through which a wide variety of important chemicals are produced.)

Homocysteine can directly damage blood vessel walls, and high levels of this chemical are associated with a significantly increased risk of cardiovascular disease and stroke. Flavoring soups and stews with sea vegetables or using them in salads is a smart strategy, especially for those dealing with atherosclerosis or diabetic heart disease.

Sea vegetables pack a double punch against heart disease. In addition to their folic acid, sea vegetables are a very good source of magnesium, which has also been shown to reduce high blood pressure and prevent heart attack.

Anti-Inflammatory Action

Some sea vegetables have been shown to be unique sources of carbohydrate-like substances called fucans, which can reduce the body’s inflammatory response. Plus, as noted above, sea vegetables are a very good source of magnesium, the mineral that, by acting as a natural relaxant, has been shown to help prevent migraine headaches and to reduce the severity of asthma symptoms.

Relief for Menopausal Symptoms

Sea vegetable’s supply of relaxing magnesium may also help restore normal sleep patterns in women who are experiencing symptoms of menopause. And the lignans in sea vegetables can act as very weak versions of estrogen, one of the hormones whose levels decrease during the menopausal period. For women suffering from symptoms such as hot flashes, sea vegetable’s lignans may be just strong enough to ease their discomfort.

Description

Sea vegetables, often called seaweed, are one of Neptune’s beautiful jewels, adorning the waters with life and providing us with a food that can enhance our diets, from both a culinary and nutritional perspective. Sea vegetables can be found growing both in the marine salt waters as well as in fresh water lakes and seas.

They commonly grow on coral reefs or in rocky landscapes, and can grow at great depths provided that sunlight can penetrate through the water to where they reside since, like plants, they need light for their survival. Yet, sea vegetables are neither plants nor animals-they are actually known as algae.

There are thousands of types of sea vegetables that are classified into categories by color, known either as brown, red or green sea vegetables. Each is unique, having a distinct shape, taste and texture. Although not all sea vegetables that exist are presently consumed, a wide range of sea vegetables are enjoyed as foods.

The following are some of the most popular types:

Nori: dark purple-black color that turns phosphorescent green when toasted, famous for its role in making sushi rolls.

Kelp: light brown to dark green in color, oftentimes available in flake form.

Hijiki: looks like small strands of black wiry pasta, has a strong flavor.

Kombu: very dark in color and generally sold in strips or sheets, oftentimes used as a flavoring for soups.

Wakame: similar to kombu, most commonly used to make Japanese miso soup.

Arame: this lacy, wiry sea vegetable is sweeter and milder in taste than many others .

Dulse: soft, chewy texture and a reddish-brown color

History

The consumption of sea vegetables enjoys a long history throughout the world. Archaeological evidence suggests that Japanese cultures have been consuming sea vegetables for more than 10,000 years.

In ancient Chinese cultures, sea vegetables were a noted delicacy, suitable especially for honored guests and royalty. Yet, sea vegetables were not just limited to being a featured part of Asian cuisines. In fact, most regions and countries located by waters, including Scotland, Ireland, Norway, Iceland, New Zealand, the Pacific Islands and coastal South American countries have been consuming sea vegetables since ancient times.

Presently, Japan is the largest producer and exporter of sea vegetables. This may explain why many of these precious foods are often called by their Japanese names.  Japan also has one of the lowest rates of disease on the planet.  50% of their diet consists of sea vegetation.

How to Select

The best way to consume sea vegetables is by liquid if you can find it.  This way, it is a live food and allows one to absorb 98% of the nutrients.  Probably the best reason is that one doesn’t have to face the rubber taste of the plants.

One of the best products available is Body Balance from Life Force International, made from a Sea Nine Blend (consists of 3 reds, 3 browns, 3 greens).  Body Balance also contains Aloe Vera which adds to the potency of the product.

References

  • Blondin C, Chaubet F, Nardella A, et al. Relationships between chemical characteristics and anticomplementary activity of fucans. Biomaterials 1996 Mar;17(6):597-603 1996. PMID:11800.
  • Blondin C, Fischer E, Boisson-Vidal C, et al. Inhibition of complement activation by natural sulfated polysaccharides (fucans) from brown seaweed. Mol Immunol 1994;31(4):247-253 1994.
  • Ensminger AH, Esminger M. K. J. e. al. Food for Health: A Nutrition Encyclopedia. Clovis, California: Pegus Press; 1986 1986. PMID:15210.
  • Goldbeck N, Goldbeck D. The Healthiest Diet in the World. Plume (Penguin Putnam Inc.) NY, 2001, pp 378-80 2001.
  • Terry P, Jain M, Miller AB et al. Dietary intake of folic acid and colorectal cancer risk in a cohort of women. Int J Cancer 2002 Feb 20;97(6):864-7 2002.
  • Wood, Rebecca. The Whole Foods Encyclopedia. New York, NY: Prentice-Hall Press; 1988 1988. PMID:15220.

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The hottest topic in medicine isn’t the newest drug or the latest surgical device: It’s vitamin D.

What brought the simmering debate to a boil was a 2007 study showing that people taking normal vitamin D supplements were 7% less likely to die than those who didn’t take the daily supplements.

A year later, a major study found that when women with low vitamin D levels get breast cancer, they have a much higher chance of dying from their cancer than women with normal vitamin D levels.

That was surprising news. But just as surprising is the fact that many men, women, and children have insufficient blood levels of this important vitamin.

How many?… Data suggest many of us don’t get the vitamin D we need. For example, a 2007 study of childbearing women in the Northern U.S. found insufficient vitamin D levels in 54% of black women and in 42% of white women.

These findings led the American Academy of Pediatrics to double the recommended amount of vitamin D a child should take — and have led many doctors to advise their adult patients to up their vitamin D intake.

Why do I need vitamin D?

Your body must have vitamin D to absorb calcium and promote bone growth. Too little vitamin D results in soft bones in children (rickets) and fragile, misshapen bones in adults (osteomalacia). You also need vitamin D for other important body functions.

Vitamin D deficiency has now been linked to breast cancer, colon cancer, prostate cancer, heart disease, depression, weight gain, and other maladies. These studies show that people with higher levels of vitamin D have a lower risk of disease, although they do not definitively prove that lack of vitamin D causes disease — or that vitamin D supplements would lower risk.

The Vitamin D Council — a scientist-led group promoting vitamin D deficiency awareness — suggests vitamin D treatment might be found helpful in treating or preventing autism, autoimmune disease, cancer, chronic pain, depression, diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, flu, neuromuscular diseases, and osteoporosis.

The best-known benefit of vitamin D is its role in helping calcium build strong bones. But that’s far from the whole story. Vitamin D helps regulate the immune system and the neuromuscular system. Vitamin D also plays major roles in the life cycle of human cells.

Vitamin D is so important that your body makes it by itself — but only after skin exposure to sufficient sunlight. This is a problem for people in northern climates. In the U.S., only people who live south of a line drawn from Los Angeles to Columbia, S.C., get enough sunlight for vitamin D production throughout the year.

Dark skin absorbs less sunlight, so people with dark skin do not get as much vitamin D from sun exposure as do light-skinned people. This is a particular problem for African-Americans in the northern U.S.

How can I get enough vitamin D?

Thirty minutes of sun exposure to the face, legs, or back — without sunscreen — at least twice a week should give you plenty of vitamin D.

But this much direct sun exposure might also expose you to potentially dangerous levels of cancer-causing UV radiation. And unless you live in the South or Southwest, you probably won’t get enough sunlight during the winter months for your body to make enough vitamin D.  The American Academy of Dermatology recommends against getting vitamin D from unprotected exposure to sunlight.

It’s a better idea to get vitamin D from foods or from supplements.

Will a vitamin D test tell me if I need more vitamin D?

Yes. As part of your regular blood test, your doctor should order a test for 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25-OHD).

Everyone agrees that anyone with a 25-OHD level of less than 15 ng/mL or 37.5 nmol/L (depending on the units reported by a lab) needs more vitamin D.  A 2002 study found that 42% of African-American women of childbearing age had vitamin D levels below 15 ng/mL.

Which foods contain vitamin D?

Surprisingly few foods contain vitamin D — unless it’s added to the food. That’s because your body is built to get vitamin D through your skin (from sunlight) rather than through your mouth (by food). But once your body has enough, it doesn’t matter whether you got it through your skin or through your stomach.

There are three vitamin D super foods:

  • Salmon (especially wild-caught)
  • Mackerel (especially wild-caught; eat up to 12 ounces a week of a variety of fish and shellfish that are low in mercury)
  • Mushrooms exposed to ultraviolet light to increase vitamin D

Other food sources of vitamin D include:

  • Cod liver oil (warning: cod liver oil is rich in vitamin A; too much may be bad for you)
  • Tuna canned in water
  • Sardines canned in oil
  • Milk or yogurt — regardless of whether it’s whole, nonfat, or reduced fat — fortified with vitamin D
  • Beef or calf liver
  • Egg yolks
  • Cheese

Nearly all milk in the U.S. is fortified with vitamin D. So are many brands of orange juice, yogurt, margarine, and ready-to-eat breakfast cereals.

How much vitamin D do I need?

The current recommended daily dose of vitamin D is 200 IU for people up to age 50, 400 IU for people aged 51 to 70, and 600 IU for people over age 70.

That’s not enough, Boston University vitamin D expert , MD, PhD, tells WebMD. Holick recommends a dose of 1,000 IU a day of vitamin D for both infants and adults — unless they’re getting plenty of safe sun exposure.

In 2008, the American Academy of Pediatrics recommended that breastfed infants receive 400 IU of vitamin D every day until they are weaned. This doubled the AAP’s previous recommendation.

The AAP also recommends 400 IU/day of vitamin D for children and teens who drink less than a quart of vitamin D-fortified milk per day.

The Vitamin D Council recommends that healthy adults take 2,000 IU of vitamin D daily — more if they get little or no sun exposure.

There’s evidence that people with a lot of body fat need more vitamin D than lean people.

The Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board is currently updating its 1997 vitamin D recommendations. A report is expected later in 2010.

Can I get too much vitamin D?

Too much of any good thing is a bad thing. Too much vitamin D can cause an abnormally high blood calcium level, which could result in nausea, constipation, confusion, abnormal heart rhythm, and even kidney stones.

It’s nearly impossible to get too much vitamin D from sunlight or from foods (unless you take way too much cod liver oil). Nearly all vitamin D overdoses come from supplements.

The Institute of Medicine’s Food and Nutrition Board’s 1997 recommendations — scheduled for a May 2010 update — suggest that 2,000 IU per day of vitamin D is safe for adults and that 1,000 IU per day is safe for infants up to 12 months of age.

However, the relatively small doses of vitamin D in daily vitamin pills are not enough to correct serious vitamin D deficiency. A 2009 study suggested that the best regimen for treating vitamin D insufficiency is 50,000 IU of vitamin D3 taken three times a week for six weeks. This time-limited regimen did not result in vitamin D toxicity.

How much vitamin D is too much?

That’s controversial. According to the National Institutes of Health, the maximum upper limit for vitamin D is 25 micrograms (1,000 IU) for children up to age 12 months and 50 micrograms (2,000 IU) for everyone else.

But some recent studies suggest that healthy adults can tolerate more than 10,000 IU of vitamin D per day. John Jacob Cannell, MD, executive director of The Vitamin D Council, notes that the skin makes 10,000 IU of vitamin D after 30 minutes of full-body sun exposure. He suggests that 10,000 IU of vitamin D is not toxic.

According to the National Institutes of Health, 25-OHD levels that are consistently over 200 ng/mL are “potentially toxic.”

What kind of vitamin D is best?

The recommended form of vitamin D is vitamin D3 or cholecalciferol. This is the natural form of vitamin D that your body makes from sunlight.

Many supplements contain vitamin D as vitamin D2 or calciferol. It’s derived from irradiated fungus. Because this is not the form of vitamin D naturally made by your body, nutritionists and medical doctors recommend using the D3 form for those taking vitamin D supplements.

Does vitamin D interact with other medications?

Yes. Steroid medications such as prednisone can interfere with vitamin D metabolism. If you take steroid drugs regularly, discuss vitamin D with your doctor.

The weight loss drug orlistat — brand names include Xenical and Alli — may cut absorption of vitamin D. So does the cholesterol-lowering drug cholestyramine (sold as Questran, LoCholest, and Prevalite). People taking these drugs should discuss vitamin intake with their doctors.

The seizure drugs Phenobarbital and Dilantin (phenytoin), affect vitamin D metabolism and affect calcium absorption. So do anti-tuberculosis drugs.

On the other hand, cholesterol-lowering statin drugs and thiazide diuretics increase vitamin D levels.

BOTTOMLINE:

Unless you live beneath the “Sun Line” from Los Angeles, California to Columbia, South Carolina or want to increase your risk of skin cancer you need to supplement with Vitamin D

Life Force International’s liquid calcium supplement OsteoProCare provides you with 1200mg of Calcium, 600mg of Magnesium, 2000 IU of Vitamin D3, Boron, Zinc, Selenium and much, much more.

To order this supplement call John @ Healthy LifeStyle Marketing (805) 646-1999 or by Email: healthy_lifestyle@roadrunner.com

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Overwhelming evidence of the need for nutritional supplementation

US Senate Document #264 documents severe mineral depletion going back to the 1930’s. The United Nations 1992 Earth Summit Report notes an average of 85% mineral depletion over the past 100 years for North American farm and range soils.

Our fruits and vegetables, as well as the grasses and vegetation that farm animals eat, are deficient in minerals and vitamins. Refining foods further reduces nutrients (such as white bread, sugar and corn syrup).

Fruits and vegetables are cultivated using chemical fertilizers, pesticides and waste contaminants Harvested prematurely and artificially ripened, produce is then sprayed, processed, radiated and coated with toxic chemicals to improve appearance and prolong shelf life—all of which significantly reduces nutritional values.

Frightening livestock production practices Beef, poultry and pork are loaded with antibiotics, hormones, steroids, drugs and toxic chemicals to reduce the risk of disease in overcrowded pens and to increase yield. These substances accumulate in our bodies, interfere with normal cell functions, trigger abnormal immune responses, stimulate premature puberty, and are often known carcinogens. As well, the transfer of antibiotics from animals to humans is resulting in bacteria and viruses that have adapted to antibiotics, thus reducing the effectiveness of
antibiotics taken by humans.

Alarming increase in immune system disorders Over the past 5 years, the incidence of immune system disorders has increased more than 200%.

Auto-immune disorders are rapidly increasing with more than 8 million cases confirmed and 30 million additional cases suspected in the US (The Autoimmune
Diseases, Third Edition, Rose and Mackay, 1998).

Fatigue and lack of energy

Doctors report that a primary health complaint is extreme fatigue and lack of energy. Hectic lifestyles, Pressure-filled jobs and commutes, financial struggles, information overload, eating on the run, depression, anxiety, coping with health issues—all rob us of vital energy and essential nutrients. According to studies by the National Institutes of Health and the National Center for Health Statistics, lifestyle related diseases, such as cancer, heart disease and diabetes are the leading causes of death in the US.

Overweight

Fast food diets laden with salt, sugar, corn syrup, refined flours, bad oils and toxic additives exacerbate health problems. A Call to Action by the US Surgeon General (2001) noted that 61% of adults in the US are overweight and that the incidence of overweight among adolescents has tripled in the past 20 years.

Environmental pollution

The air we breathe and the water we drink are contaminated with a wide variety of pollutants.

Bowel irregularities

Stagnating waste and chronic constipation can poison the entire body.

Substance Abuse

Alcohol, tobacco and drugs (including many prescription drugs) all have significant side effects and long-term health implications.

What to Look for in a Dietary Supplement

Whole food is the key

The body recognizes whole foods and can readily assimilate and utilize them. Synthetic nutrients formulated in a lab lack the full spectrum of naturally occurring phytonutrients, antioxidants, vitamins, minerals, bioflavonoids and other micronutrients. The lack of these co-factors limits absorption, increases the risk of toxicity and can even cause secondary nutrient deficiencies.

Liquid form

When a whole food dietary supplement is in a liquid, ionic solution, up to 98% of the nutrients are available for absorption and utilization by the body. Vitamins and minerals in pill form may be only 10% to 20% absorbable (1996 Physicians Desk Ref., pg 1542).

Natural and complete

Sea vegetables are the most mineral-rich plants on earth. They contain more vitamins and minerals than any form of land vegetation. Sea water contains mineral ratios that are remarkably similar to blood plasma. Sea plants pre-digest and concentrate this balanced source of minerals into a highly bioavailable ionic state.

Whole food dietary supplements are safe

They supplement the vegetables and fruits in your diet—a vital part of healthy eating and a good food budget. Whole food products are excellent prenatal supplements. Supplements in liquid whole food form may also increase the efficiency of diets, medicines and herbs, while reducing the time required to achieve the desired results.

Organic minerals

Minerals exist in two forms, organic and inorganic. Organic minerals are far easier for the body to use. Inorganic minerals can be used, but must be converted to organic form through chelation. Chelation attaches an organic carrier so that minerals can be transported through cell walls. Excellent chelating agents include
organic acids such as amino acids and orotic acid.

Sea vegetables

With the passage of untold millennium, vast amounts of life-sustaining minerals have washed into the sea. In the process of converting sunlight to energy, sea vegetables reabsorb these nutrients and organically bind them in an ionic state. In contrast, modern farming practices have depleted our soils of essential nutrients —thus sea vegetables are far superior nutritionally to land vegetables. Additionally, minerals that are toxic in their natural state, such as iodine, arsenic and aluminum, are neutralized by the sea vegetables—this makes them harmless and even beneficial. For example, iodine in its pure form is poisonous—however, in its ionic form it is an essential nutrient for health.

Sea vegetable harvesting

Sea vegetables should be harvested only when fully ripened and from pristine waters. These arctic regeneration zones are biologically active areas that are free from herbicides, pesticides and heavy metal contamination. Tides and intense sunlight provide a constant state of nutrient-enriched plants and a rich feeding ground for many species. Harvesting the tender new growth of these plants increases their rate of growth.

Blending with Aloe Vera

Blending sea vegetables with Aloe vera juice adds to the nutritional value of the dietary supplement. Aloe varies widely in quality. Look for whole-leaf, cold processed juice that is certified by the International Aloe Science Council.

Aloe vera has been one of the most popular remedies throughout human history. A vast body of research confirms that Aloe vera has powerful healing and soothing properties. In addition, it contains large-chain sugar molecules that are ideal transporters of nutrients.

Although there are over 200 species of aloe, one of the best is Aloe Barbadensis, which contains over 75 nutritional compounds including vitamins, minerals and 18 amino acids. It has long been used for ailments ranging from cuts, burns and bruises to digestive and intestinal irregularities.

Black cherry and honey

Black cherry has been shown to reduce uric acid levels in the body, while bee honey is an excellent source of B complex vitamins, royal jelly, propolis and pollen.

Benefits of Sea Plants Blended with Aloe Vera

Contains every essential nutrient in perfect balance

  • Vitamins
  • Macro minerals
  • Trace minerals
  • Amino acids
  • Essential fatty acids
  • Enzymes

Cleanses the colon and normalizes pH levels

  • Facilitates elimination
  • Enhances assimilation
  • Improves absorption

Supports the circulatory and lymphatic systems

  • Detoxifies
  • Nourishes
  • Promotes Healing

Supports the immune system and Fortifies the body with essential nutrients needed to fight disease

Supports the nervous system

  • Fights the effects of stress
  • Improves vitality
  • Promotes a feeling of well-being

Supports metabolic processes

  • Facilitates digestion
  • Reduces cravings
  • Nourishes the glandular system

Increases oxygen at the cellular level

  • Promotes energy
  • Combats aging
  • Promotes stamina
  • Supports memory

Excellent source of antioxidants

Contains free radical scavengers known to reduce the risk of cancer, heart disease and strokes

Anti-inflammatory properties

  • Helps relieve inflammatory diseases
  • Helps reduce inflammation in arthritis
  • Helps reduce inflammation in sports injuries

Combats side effects of harmful substances

  • Alcohol
  • Tobacco
  • Drugs
  • Environmental Pollutants

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Here is a great article by Linda Page about the nutritional power of sea vegetables and Aloe Vera…Enjoy

Sea Vegetables-Nature’s Healthy Gifts From The Sea

By Linda Page, N.D., Ph.D./HealthyHealing.com

http://healthyhealing.com/

In Western countries, land vegetables are the traditional sources of greens, but vegetables from the sea are nutritious foods and powerful healers that have been used by European and Asian cultures for centuries. I eat sea vegetables every day. I recommend them as a critical part of many healing programs-detoxification, illness recovery, heart healthy, hormone balancing for women (and men), and much more! Sea Vegetables can literally transform your health. When you drink sea vegetables, or take seaweed baths, you’re tapping into the ancestral and restorative source of all life-the ocean. Just a few of the miraculous health benefits of sea vegetables:

Super Nutrition

Ounce for ounce, along with herbs, sea vegetables are higher in vitamins and minerals than any other food. Sea vegetables are really the ocean’s deep greens, rich in vegetable protein, and full-spectrum concentrations of important carotenes, chlorophyll, enzymes, amino acids and fiber. They are the only vegetarian source of B-12 for cell health, containing amounts that rival beef liver (the leading animal source). They are an excellent source of body building minerals like calcium, iron, iodine, and potassium. Sea vegetables contain trace minerals like boron, chromium and selenium that are vital to health, but that modern farming techniques have leached from the soil.

Our body fluids have the same chemical composition as seawater. The same trace elements than run through the oceans run through the human body. Seaplant chemical composition is so close to human plasma that perhaps the greatest benefit from sea vegetables is promoting our internal rebalance. Sea vegetables act as the ocean’s purifiers, and they perform many of the same functions for our bodies.

Detoxification

Sea vegetables offer superior protection from radiation and heavy poisoning. Studies done a McGill University reveal algin, a component of sea greens like kelp and alaria, binds to heavy metals and chemical pollutants in the intestinal tract, allowing them to be safely eliminated from the body. Seaplant algin even binds to radioactive strontium (one of the most hazardous atomic pollutants), radioactive iodine-131, barium, zinc, and cadmium, flushing them out of the body before they can even poison us. Sea vegetables are so effective that the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission recommends that people consume two to three ounces of sea vegetables a day for maximum protection against radiation poisoning.

Major Disease Protection

Sea Vegetables are an excellent addition to you natural arsenal against cancer and heart disease. Further, sea vegetables help dissolve fatty deposits in the cardiovascular system that lead to heart disease, and relieve tension in the blood vessels caused by over-consumption of table salt. Japanese studies from the 1960’s show sea vegetables extracts control high blood pressure and atherosclerosis in animals fed in a high cholesterol diet. The same studies show that sea vegetables lower blood pressure in people, too.

Hormone Balancing For Women

Sea vegetables can ease the discomforts of menopause. They are a rich source of fat-soluble vitamins D and K that assist with production of steroidal hormones like estrogen and DHEA in adrenal glands play a key role in shoring up hormone production when estrogen production slows down during menopause. Vitamin K in sea vegetables especially boosts adrenal activity; ingesting them can help maintain female hormone balance for a more youthful body for years to come. Sea plants also nourish an under active thyroid to trigger increased libido in women after menopause.

Sea vegetables are especially good for stimulating metabolism in overweight pets. Dosage: about 1 to 2 tbls. for dogs and 1tsp. for cats.

Copyright 200 Traditional Wisdom Inc. For more information about Linda Page, free healing programs, free recipes, please visit:

http://www.healthyhealing.com

Website Resources

Resources for Sea Vegetables

Phytonutrients http://www.ars.usda.gov

They are constantly updating their website with new information and articles. All of these can be found in the Nutrition section of the website.

Trace Substances.

Sea Water and Blood Ratio’s are the same.

Chloride 48%

Sodium 44%

Sulfate 3.3%

Potassium 2.4%

Calcium 1.3%

Magnesium .03%

Sea greens = vitamins, B12, A,C,D,E,B, minerals, amino acids, protein, chlorophyll, enzymes, fiber, fatty acids, antioxidants, immune system, anti HIV.


http://www.4source.com/technical/nutraceuticals_world.shtml

http://www.seaveg.com/bibliography.html

Resources for Aloe Vera

Aloe Vera stimulates cell growth and tissue healing. It aids in detoxifying, cleanses liver, cleanses kidney, helps breakdown and eliminate trapped matter in colon and a gentle laxative. Powerful aid with digestion. Great for skin conditions such as boils, burns, hemorrhoids and anti-inflammatory. Wonderful antiperspirant. It has 20 of 22 amino acids including 8 essential nutrients. It is an excellent vitamin B12 source.

http://www.wholeleaf.com/aloeverainformation.html

Liquid vitamin/mineral supplement

Body Balance...Nutrition as Mother Nature Intended


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